Tuesday, January 29, 2013

Citizenship

berry flag cake

Dearest readers, I am in the process of becoming a real American. As you've probably gleaned from reading this blog, Russia is the country of my citizenship. I've been living in the US for 9.5 years, and although I feel very much American, I hadn't had a compelling reason to become a citizen.

One of the main reasons U.S. immigrants apply for citizenship is to make traveling easier. Having a U.S. passport means a lot of countries welcome you with open arms instead of requiring visas. Easy travel hadn't been a lure for me because I've travelled (and been in precarious living situations) far too much when I was younger. So, while my peers are seeking out out-of-comfort-zone experiences, I've been trying to find (or create) my comfort-zone.

Consider my mind changed. On New Year's Day, Forrest filled out my N400 (Application for Naturalization) form, I wrote a check for $680.00, a USPS employee haphazardly slapped some stamps on the manila envelope the next day, and it was off. I know it's kind of old news, but it didn't feel real until today. Today I had my biometrics appointment (where they take 30 fingerprints of my 10 fingers) and was given a packet of questions to study for my citizenship exam.

So, this is really happening! Getting nervous/excited now.

8 comments :

  1. Very cool, congratulations! Don't forget you'll also be able to vote and hold political office :)

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  2. We will be there with flowers, flags, and milk chocolate!!

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    1. Yeah, Sue, especially don't forget flags! :-)

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  3. Way to go, girl. I don't feel so bad that we missed out on Gérard Depardieu now.

    You sound more excited than the easy travel would warrant, so perhaps you had more of a desire to do this, regardless of its benefits, than you have been admitting to yourself. :)

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  4. Of course the best benefit is that they can't deport you when you become a meth kingpin, provided you tell the truth on your forms and in your interviews. ;)

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    1. Hahaha. Mr. White, I'm joining your meth lab!

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  5. SO exciting! I relate 100% to seeking to define a comfort zone now rather than the opposite.

    Also, re: toe shoes - do you seriously run run in them, or just wear them around? I'm willing to explore them as an exploring shoe option (maybe), but running on pavement??!

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    1. Hahaha! I run, run in those - yes. I run on pavement until I get to the trailhead (which is roughly a mile there, and a mile back). I think I have really strong running bones (which makes for terrible ballet legs). Every one on track and xcountry always struggled with shin splints. I have no idea what that even feels like.

      Also, my dad has been running every single day for decades. Guess what shoe he runs in. CONVERSE! (He's so weird.)

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